Steve Gold's Treasured Bits of Information

Brown v. Board of Education - Information Bulletin # 66

Date Mailed: Monday, May 17th 2004 07:06 AM
Category: Education

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Brown v. Board of Education - Information Bulletin # 66   5/04

    May 17, 2004 marks the 50th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of=20
Education decision in which the Supreme Court held that school districts vio=
lated the=20
Fourteenth Amendment by racially segregating children in schools.=20

    What follows is a review of segregation of children based on disability.=
=20

    The latest data from the U.S. Department of Education, which annually=20
collects this data state by state and submits it to Congress, presents the=20
following data for the 5,594,431 students between the ages of 6 and 18 with=20
disabilities:
       =20
        *   A composite of "All Disabilities" shows that more than 1,236,373=
=20
children=E2=80=93 22% of the total =E2=80=93  with disabilities remain in se=
gregated=20
settings, i.e., they are either entirely in "Separate Schools and Facilities=
" or spend=20
more than 60 percent of their time "Outside Regular Classes," in separate=20
classes for children with disabilities.  (These are the definitions used by=20=
the=20
U.S. Dept. of Education.)

    *   The flip side shows that only 2,742,219 =E2=80=93 less than half of=20=
all=20
children with disabilities =E2=80=93 are "integrated" in their schools, i.e.=
, they spend=20
less than 21 percent of their time Outside Regular Classes or, in clearer te=
rms,=20
they spend more than 79% of their time in "regular" classes with children wh=
o=20
are not disabled.

    *   The middle 29% are children with disabilities who spend between 21 -=
=20
60% of their school hours "Outside Regular Classes," presumably in "resource=
=20
rooms" only for children with disabilities.   Obviously, the more time they=20
spend "OUTSIDE regular classes," i.e., closer to 60% than 21% of time, the m=
ore=20
they are segregated.

    A snap shot by specific disability classification shows:

    *   For children who have only an "orthopedic impairment"(these children=
=20
have no other disabilities),  30.2% are in segregated settings (i.e., spend=20
more than 60% of their time outside regular classes).

    *   For children who have either only a "hearing impairment," 37% are=20
segregated and for children who have only a "visual impairment," 27.6% are=20
segregated.

    *   By far the most segregation occurs for children classified as having=
=20
"Mental Retardation."  57.3% of this population are segregated.

    A breakdown by State =E2=80=93 not local school districts =E2=80=93 and=20=
by disability,=20
graduation rates, drop out rates, etc.,can be found at=20
http://www.ideadata.org/PartBDataMeeting2004.asp    Just click on your State=
.

    School and education advocates have for too long been primarily parents=20
of individual disabled children.  As with housing and Olmstead issues, the=20
SCHOOL segregation of children with disabilities in schools and educational=20
settings must become an issue that goes far beyond the direct participants.=20=
 A truly=20
inclusive society and educational system can and should integrate children=20
with disabilities.=20

    While education is a "local" issue and you local school districts should=
=20
be held accountable for segregating children with disabilities, your State=20
Department of Education can and should =E2=80=93 as a policy issue =E2=80=
=93 review why such=20
segregation exists in your local school district.  Advocates should review t=
he=20
extent of disability segregation school district by school district. =20

    Disability advocates must make education more than an individual child's=
=20
issue; we must organize around education.  Pretend every child with a=20
disability is your own; would you accept a segregated educational system for=
 your=20
child?

    Tell your school boards and state educational officials that Jim Crow=20
education for children is NOT acceptable, whether based on race or disabilit=
y.

    Steve Gold, The Disability Odyssey continues

Back issues of other Information Bulletins are available online at=20
http://www.stevegoldada.com=20
with a searchable Archive at this site divided into different subjects.    =20

TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST: To Unsubscribe from this mailing list, send a=20
message to majordomo@stevegoldada.com and in the body of the message include=
=20
ONLY: unsubscribe stevegoldada =20
TO SUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST, send a message to majordomo@stevegoldada.com and=
=20
in the body of the message include ONLY: subscribe stevegoldada=20
=20

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<HTML><FONT FACE=3Darial,helvetica><HTML><FONT  SIZE=3D2 PTSIZE=3D10 FAMILY=
=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">Brown v. Board of Education - Infor=
mation Bulletin # 66&nbsp;&nbsp; 5/04<BR>
<BR>
    May 17, 2004 marks the 50th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Educati=
on decision in which the Supreme Court held that school districts violated t=
he Fourteenth Amendment by racially segregating children in schools. <BR>
<BR>
    What follows is a review of segregation of children based on disability.=
 <BR>
<BR>
    The latest data from the U.S. Department of Education, which annually co=
llects this data state by state and submits it to Congress, presents the fol=
lowing data for the 5,594,431 students between the ages of 6 and 18 with dis=
abilities:<BR>
        <BR>
        *   A composite of "All Disabilities" shows that more than 1,236,373=
 children=E2=80=93 22% of the total =E2=80=93&nbsp; with disabilities remain=
 in segregated settings, i.e., they are either entirely in "Separate Schools=
 and Facilities" or spend more than 60 percent of their time "Outside Regula=
r Classes," in separate classes for children with disabilities.&nbsp; (These=
 are the definitions used by the U.S. Dept. of Education.)<BR>
<BR>
    *   The flip side shows that only 2,742,219 =E2=80=93 less than half of=20=
all children with disabilities =E2=80=93 are "integrated" in their schools,=20=
i.e., they spend less than 21 percent of their time Outside Regular Classes=20=
or, in clearer terms, they spend more than 79% of their time in "regular" cl=
asses with children who are not disabled.<BR>
<BR>
    *   The middle 29% are children with disabilities who spend between 21 -=
 60% of their school hours "Outside Regular Classes," presumably in "resourc=
e rooms" only for children with disabilities.&nbsp;&nbsp; Obviously, the mor=
e time they spend "OUTSIDE regular classes," i.e., closer to 60% than 21% of=
 time, the more they are segregated.<BR>
<BR>
&nbsp;   A snap shot by specific disability classification shows:<BR>
<BR>
    *   For children who have only an "orthopedic impairment"(these children=
 have no other disabilities),&nbsp; 30.2% are in segregated settings (i.e.,=20=
spend more than 60% of their time outside regular classes).<BR>
<BR>
    *   For children who have either only a "hearing impairment," 37% are se=
gregated and for children who have only a "visual impairment," 27.6% are seg=
regated.<BR>
<BR>
    *   By far the most segregation occurs for children classified as having=
 "Mental Retardation."&nbsp; 57.3% of this population are segregated.<BR>
<BR>
    A breakdown by State =E2=80=93 not local school districts =E2=80=93 and=20=
by disability, graduation rates, drop out rates, etc.,can be found at http:/=
/www.ideadata.org/PartBDataMeeting2004.asp&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Just click on y=
our State.<BR>
<BR>
    School and education advocates have for too long been primarily parents=20=
of individual disabled children.&nbsp; As with housing and Olmstead issues,=20=
the SCHOOL segregation of children with disabilities in schools and educatio=
nal settings must become an issue that goes far beyond the direct participan=
ts.&nbsp; A truly inclusive society and educational system can and should in=
tegrate children with disabilities. <BR>
<BR>
    While education is a "local" issue and you local school districts should=
 be held accountable for segregating children with disabilities, your State=20=
Department of Education can and should =E2=80=93 as a policy issue =E2=80=
=93 review why such segregation exists in your local school district.&nbsp;=20=
Advocates should review the extent of disability segregation school district=
 by school district.&nbsp; <BR>
<BR>
    Disability advocates must make education more than an individual child's=
 issue; we must organize around education.&nbsp; Pretend every child with a=20=
disability is your own; would you accept a segregated educational system for=
 your child?<BR>
<BR>
    Tell your school boards and state educational officials that Jim Crow ed=
ucation for children is NOT acceptable, whether based on race or disability.=
<BR>
<BR>
    Steve Gold, The Disability Odyssey continues<BR>
<BR>
Back issues of other Information Bulletins are available online at http://ww=
w.stevegoldada.com <BR>
with a searchable Archive at this site divided into different subjects.&nbsp=
;    <BR>
<BR>
TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST: To Unsubscribe from this mailing list, send a=20=
message to majordomo@stevegoldada.com and in the body of the message include=
 ONLY: unsubscribe stevegoldada&nbsp; <BR>
TO SUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST, send a message to majordomo@stevegoldada.com and=
 in the body of the message include ONLY: subscribe stevegoldada <BR>
 </FONT></HTML>

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